Tag Archives | Nan Schwartz

A Spotify Statistic Today

Nan_Schwartz_RecordSo it turns out that my record of the orchestral music of Nan Schwartz (see image) has had over 507,000 plays in just over three-and-a-half months since the record was released on the Divine Art Records label in March this year.

Who knew?

Well besides the 507,000 very kind folk who’ve discovered this American composer’s consumate and extraordinary music (courtesy of an initial promotion by Naxos  on their Spotify Playlist – thank you guys!) it seems that the ‘established’ classical music press haven’t quite caught up.

It’s an interesting statistic when you compare Nan’s numbers to some of the apparently better recognised names (current artists, composers and conductors) flaunted by the major record labels and their Spotify statistics over the same period!

Ah, well, all in good time I imagine.

Kevin

The Orchestral Music of Nan Schwartz

Well, it is almost upon us!  After two years – almost to the day – three continents for recording sessions and the contribution of some of the best musicians on the planet, the Nan Schwartz album will hit the streets on March 9 (UK) and March 16 (USA) through Divine Art Records.

It’s often difficult to remain entirely detached from creative work in which you have been directly involved.  That said, this is a record of contemporary new classical music unlike anything I have heard (and I have heard almost everything) in the last 20 years.  The reason is that the music is so utterly brilliant and captivating, it seems literally impossible to contemplate why these pieces by America’s greatest living woman composer have gone unrecorded!

I have thought about this a lot over recent months watching the exciting and seemingly inexorable movement around the world to finally give women the recognition they deserve in the Entertainment and Arts worlds. What it has highlighted to me is how artists of extraordinary abilities can be so easily subsumed by an industry that only seeks out the ‘latest’ and ‘most hip’ trends (I’m sure those words are probably out-of-date) failing to ever look more closely for, and at the work from, Artists whose calibre of work outstrips the ‘latest’ and ‘most hip’ by eons.

The classical music industry is notoriously indolent in not seeking out new work that will have broad appeal to audiences trying to “get into” classical music and who wish to go further than the same, rather tired, playlists so often foist upon unsuspecting audiences by broadcasters.  I hope, in some small way, this might change with this record for there is is so much wonderful new classical music being written all around the world that most people never get to hear.

Finally, a word of encouragement to the numerous orchestras around the world looking for programming ideas – LISTEN TO THIS RECORD!

If you’d like to read more and listen to some excerpts from this marvellous new recording, please click here.

Take care,

Kevin

Recordings in June and July

I have had remarkably little time in the last month, other than to keep my head above that euphemistically imaginary line labelled ‘Drowning’.  I have started to consider how much music can one conductor keep in his/her head at any one time.  Without doubt, I have discovered my limit!

This month sees the culmination of two recording projects, for release in 2017, that have been long in the planning and about to be short in the execution.

The first of these projects is the new CD of the music of contemporary American composer, Nan Schwartz to be recorded at the marvellous Synchron Stage facility in Vienna. The original Synchronhalle was built in the 1940s, adjacent to Rosenhügel-Filmstudios as part of “Film City Vienna”. In the 1960s, eminent classical artists such as Karl Böhm, Herbert von Karajan, Yehudi Menuhin, Sviatoslav Richter and Mstislav Rostropovich used the halle for some of their now-legendary recordings.

Nan Schwartz

Nan Schwartz

Nan Schwartz comes from a family musical pedigree that is astounding, yet simultaneously defining in the emergence of her own unique musical voice in Amercian Music. Contrary to the availability of her Jazz arrangements, television and film music on records and CDs, the lack of available commercial recordings of Nan’s concert music is a major oversight – one that is about to be corrected.

Her family legacy includes a father who played with the Glenn Miller Orchestra and performed on nearly every Frank Sinatra recording, and a mother who performed such chart-topping hits as “Chicago” and “On the Sunny Side of the Street” for musical legend Tommy Dorsey before going on to work as a studio singer for Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Judy Garland, Henry Mancini, and Sonny and Cher, among others.

With a record 7 Emmy nominations, a Grammy win for her elegant and sophisticated arrangement of “Here’s That Rainy Day” for Natalie Cole, two 2014 Grammy nominations (Gianmarco & Amy Dickson), and a 2013 Grammy nomination (The London Symphony Orchestra) Nan’s melodic, harmonically-rich music, is a perfect vehicle for symphony orchestras to peform.  No doubt you will start to see her name on orchestra concert programs in the near future.

The second project is the recording of Brenton Broadstock’s concerto for orchestra, Made in Heaven, that I premiered with the Australian Discovery Orchestra two weeks ago in one of their live-streamed Internet concerts.  This is a marvellous piece and a wonderful homage to ‘Kind of Blue’, the iconic Jazz album of 1959 from Miles Davis.  It is incredible how this large-scale work (for a very large orchestra) captures the heart and soul of this Jazz masterpiece without ever using a single melody from any tune on the record – it’s like a classical music counterpart to the five tunes that make up the album.

Made in Heaven will be recorded in Bratislava in early July.

More soon,

Kevin