VICTOR KAZAN Writer Director Actor

Kazan_Low_ResVictor Kazan read modern languages at the University of London before training as an actor. After a brief spell in repertory he turned to directing. He was soon working in commercial theatre and, between engagements, began writing for film and television. Throughout the 1970s he worked extensively in Britain, Europe, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, directing a wide variety of theatre productions – from the hit comedy Two and Two Make Sex to the popular thriller Deathtrap, from Romeo and Juliet to My Fair Lady. He is honored to have worked with such stage luminaries as Margaret Lockwood, Richard Todd and Judi Dench. As a writer, his screenplays during this period included La Vida, Lie Down When You’re Dead and Modigliani; and as a lyricist, he was to collaborate on his first stage musical, A Little Bit of Fluff.

Taking up residence in Melbourne in the early 1980s, he immediately found work as an actor and went on to play major guest roles in the television series The Sullivans, Prisoner, Cop Shop, Carson’s Law, The Paul Hogan Show, Sugar and Spice, Fast Lane and Embassy; and in the miniseries Eureka Stockade, Black Boomerang, Waterfront and The Petrov Affair. He also appeared in a number of films including A Slice of Life, Every Move She Makes and Kangaroo. Among his Australian theatre directing credits are his highly-acclaimed productions of the musical Blues in the Night, and the award-winning comedy Funny Peculiar.

In recent years he has worked almost exclusively as a screenwriter, playwright and lyricist. He wrote the documentary films Smithy Revisited and Present Day Dinosaurs. His screenplays include the miniseries Requiem for a Wren and the feature films McGregor Rules, The Last Supper and Dalkeith. For the theatre, he penned the musical review Rome and All That Jazz and an adaptation of Pirandello’s Six Character In Search Of An Author; and for the musical stage he wrote the book and lyrics for Atlantis and Rebecca.

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