Tag Archives | Nan Schwartz

And We’re in Planning Mode 2019 –

As we move toward the release of new recordings in 2019, following up on our release of the amazingly successful and critically well-received album, The Orchestral Music of Nan Schwartz released on Divine Art (dda 25165) earlier this year – and which is currently placed in three separate categories for the 61st Grammy Award nominations – I have been researching how we carry out the planning, collaborative execution, and post-recording editing of records that we want to complete going forward whether with the Australian Discovery Orchestra or with other orchestras in Europe.

As part of this work, I have come across the work of Dr. Amy Blier-Carruthers from the Royal Academy of Music in the UK.  This video presentation (ca. 30 minutes in duration) from a conference held at IRCAM in 2015 is quite informative.  It’s rare to see complete conference presentations online available for free (without the rigmarole of signing up/signing in).


Dr. Blier-Carruthers attempts to unravel the dichotomy between perfection in performance (however this is defined) we strive for in recording sessions and the inevitable compromise that can ensue in loss of music-making in the pursuit of those idealogies around perfection. It’s courageous on all levels to pursue this because the commercial imperatives of releasing recordings that are not otherwise “perfect” in all respects is, in my view, currently insurmountable.
Nan_Schwartz_Record
One of the incredible accomplishments in the making of the Nan Schwartz record was that it was made more possible to achieve both audio perfection and nuanced musical peformances, because Nan’s music is so well crafted and written.

This is most definitely not the case most of the time!

It’s in the academic domain, but I warmly recommend this video presentation, as above, to those of you interested in the fast-changing world of classical music recording.

More soon,

Kevin

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A Spotify Statistic Today

Nan_Schwartz_RecordSo it turns out that my record of the orchestral music of Nan Schwartz (see image) has had over 507,000 plays in just over three-and-a-half months since the record was released on the Divine Art Records label in March this year.

Who knew?

Well besides the 507,000 very kind folk who’ve discovered this American composer’s consumate and extraordinary music (courtesy of an initial promotion by Naxos  on their Spotify Playlist – thank you guys!) it seems that the ‘established’ classical music press haven’t quite caught up.

It’s an interesting statistic when you compare Nan’s numbers to some of the apparently better recognised names (current artists, composers and conductors) flaunted by the major record labels and their Spotify statistics over the same period!

Ah, well, all in good time I imagine.

Kevin

The Orchestral Music of Nan Schwartz

Well, it is almost upon us!  After two years – almost to the day – three continents for recording sessions and the contribution of some of the best musicians on the planet, the Nan Schwartz album will hit the streets on March 9 (UK) and March 16 (USA) through Divine Art Records.

It’s often difficult to remain entirely detached from creative work in which you have been directly involved.  That said, this is a record of contemporary new classical music unlike anything I have heard (and I have heard almost everything) in the last 20 years.  The reason is that the music is so utterly brilliant and captivating, it seems literally impossible to contemplate why these pieces by America’s greatest living woman composer have gone unrecorded!

I have thought about this a lot over recent months watching the exciting and seemingly inexorable movement around the world to finally give women the recognition they deserve in the Entertainment and Arts worlds. What it has highlighted to me is how artists of extraordinary abilities can be so easily subsumed by an industry that only seeks out the ‘latest’ and ‘most hip’ trends (I’m sure those words are probably out-of-date) failing to ever look more closely for, and at the work from, Artists whose calibre of work outstrips the ‘latest’ and ‘most hip’ by eons.

The classical music industry is notoriously indolent in not seeking out new work that will have broad appeal to audiences trying to “get into” classical music and who wish to go further than the same, rather tired, playlists so often foist upon unsuspecting audiences by broadcasters.  I hope, in some small way, this might change with this record for there is is so much wonderful new classical music being written all around the world that most people never get to hear.

Finally, a word of encouragement to the numerous orchestras around the world looking for programming ideas – LISTEN TO THIS RECORD!

If you’d like to read more and listen to some excerpts from this marvellous new recording, please click here.

Take care,

Kevin